Recent Alaska Shipping News

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Jump to
Driving with firearms
Driving with marijuana
Driving while on the phone
Trailers
Headlight use
Minimum age to drive
Conclusion

alaska-road-sign

 
Alaska has some very interesting laws about driving. Some may even seem outright odd to you. You should be aware of these before you start driving there. This way you can avoid getting any tickets. Although, several of these laws actually allow drivers a little bit more freedom regarding certain things such as marijuana or firearms.
 

Driving with firearms

If you are over the age of twenty-one in Alaska with a valid driver’s license you can carry a firearm in your vehicle even if it is:

  • Loaded
  • In clear view and within reach
  • Concealed

 

Driving with Marijuana

If you are twenty-one years of age or older in Alaska, you can drive with marijuana in your vehicle even if it is not for medical use.
However, you may not drive under the influence of marijuana and you can not use it in public.
 

Driving while on the phone

In Alaska, you may not drive while using any sort of visual screen device. This means you can’t text, browse the web, or do anything that involves looking at your phone while you drive.

However, you may talk on the phone while you drive. Even if you are talking on the phone with it in your hand and held to your head, it is perfectly legal.

This law does also prohibit the use of tablets, laptops or any other “visual screen devices.”
 

Trailers

This is probably the strangest one on this list, but it is a law, nonetheless. A person can not ride in a trailer while it is being moved along a street. So, this means you can’t occupy any trailer, even if it is a house trailer, if it is not part of the vehicle being driven. Recreational vehicles are an exception to this because the live-in part of the vehicle is in the same part of the vehicle which drives.
 

Headlight use

There are a couple of interesting provisions regarding the use of your headlights in Alaska:

  • Flashing your headlights – You cannot use your high-beams within five hundred feet of an oncoming vehicle. This really means that flashing your headlights to let another driver know that their headlights are off at night or about police down the road could easily get you a ticket.
  • Daytime headlight use – During certain periods of the year, namely the low-light winter months, most Alaskan roadways require that your headlights be on at all times while you are operating your vehicle. If you want to play it safe without having to look up the specific laws and regulations for each road that you will be traveling on, we recommend that you keep your headlights on at all times regardless of the time of year or day.

 

Minimum age to drive

Alaska is tied with a few other states with the lowest minimum driving age in the United States. In Alaska, a person only needs to be fourteen years of age to get their learner’s permit.

The other states that allow someone to get their learner’s permit at fourteen are Arkansas, Iowa, North Dakota, and South Dakota with several other states allowing people ages fourteen and six months or fourteen and nine months to get their permits.
 

Conclusion

There are definitely several interesting laws in Alaska regarding driving. It is one of the more lenient states with laws about driving with marijuana and firearms. This is likely because of how difficult travel can be in Alaska.

No matter what the laws are in a place like Alaska, always remember to drive with caution. There can be very tough inclement weather conditions out on the road as well as wildlife crossing the roadways at various times of the year.

Posted in: Alaska Car Shipping

alaska-port

 
Jump To:
Tacoma
Anchorage
Kodiak
Fairbanks
Tips for picking your car up at the port
Conclusion

 
If you are shipping your car to Alaska, you will eventually need to pick up your car at the port. There are several ports in Alaska that you can have your car shipped to.

Note that for all ports there is a $450 fee for inoperable vehicles. There is also a $150 fee for any drop-offs made during the weekend.
 

Tacoma

The Tacoma port hours are Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 12 PM and 1 PM to 3 PM.

The Tacoma port address is 1675 Lincoln Avenue (Loop), building 200, Tacoma, WA 98421.

Storage is free for five days then $51 per day after that.
 

Anchorage

The anchorage port hours are Monday and Wednesday through Friday from 8 AM to 12 PM and 1 PM to 3:30 PM.

The Anchorage port address is 1717 Tidewater Road, Anchorage, AK 99501.

Storage is free for three days then $79 per day after that.
 

Kodiak

The Kodiak port hours are Tuesday and Thursday only from 1 PM to 4:30 PM.

The Kodiak port address is 727 Shelikof Street, Pier 2 Kodiak, AK 99615.

Storage is free for seven days then $51 per day after that.
 

Fairbanks

The Fairbanks port hours are Monday to Friday from 9 AM to 5 PM.

The Fairbanks port address is 615 12TH Avenue, Fairbanks, AK 99701.

Storage is free for three days then $51 after that.
 

Tips for picking your car up at the port

  • Get some gas – If you followed instructions properly, you only filled your gas tank a quarter. You will need to get some more gas once you pick your car up.
  • Get an inspection – You will want a professional to look your car over once you pick it up. It is very rare, but sometime bumps during the trip could knock something loose or out of place on your car.
  • Get a car wash – Your car will likely have some dust and dirt from the trip. Get it cleaned as soon as possible.
  • Inspect the car thoroughly – As soon as you get to your car, inspect it thoroughly. If there are any scratches or dents, be sure to make note of it on the bill of lading.

 

Conclusion

Picking your car up at the port is a pretty easy process as long as you are prepared properly. Remember, your delivery date is a window, rather than a guaranteed date. So, be ready to get to the port during the window you were given. It is usually a three to five day time-frame. You will get a couple days of free storage so if you can’t get to the port on the same day your car is dropped off and deemed ready, you can always go the next day or day after that.

The port is closed on the weekend, but those days do count towards your free storage. So, if your car is dropped off on a Friday and you can’t make it that day to pick it up, you will likely need to on the following Monday.

If you need your car shipped to Alaska, ship it with the car shipping experts at Alaska Car Transport. You can get a free quote today by clicking here.

Posted in: Alaska Car Shipping

Jump to:
Get your car winterized
Drive Slow
Tips for driving in the snow and ice
Conclusion

driving in the snow

 
Driving in winter weather conditions can be very dangerous if you do not take the proper precautions. In Alaska, you will almost inevitably end up driving in winter weather but not all the time. In some lower parts of Alaska, you will see fairly normal weather, especially in the summer months, compared to central and upper Alaska.

Regardless, if you know you will be driving in Alaska at some point in the future. It is best to get prepared to drive safely through winter weather conditions such as snowy and icy roads with low visibility.

Get your car winterized

One of the very first things that you will want to do in order to prepare to drive in the potentially inclement Alaskan weather conditions is to get your car winterized. There are a few ways you can go about this. You can take it to an auto shop and tell them “I need my car winterized” and give them a few hours to a day or two and you will be all set.

You could also do it yourself. It will likely take more time and definitely take more effort on your part, but you will end up saving a few dollars in the process.

Either way, you will want to make sure you have the following done to your car to ensure it is fully winterized:

  • Make sure you have your anti-freeze filled – Make sure your anti-freeze is filled and that it is diluted with water by fifty percent. You can test your current anti-freeze mixture by buying one at a local auto parts store such as AutoZone. You also need to make sure you have extra anti-freeze in your trunk just in case you run low while you are driving.
  • Get a new battery – Your battery is always critical to your car. This is especially true in cold weather. You do not actually need to get a new battery but if you don’t you will need to get your current battery checked by a mechanic. If that is what you choose to do, then you might as well pay the extra couple of dollars and let the mechanic perform the whole process of winterizing your vehicle.
  • Get some snow tires, some sand and a shovel – That probably sounds like a weird thought, but both of those things have a lot to do with the traction you will be able to get in the snow. Snow tires retain flexibility better in colder weather than normal tires. They also have much better treads on them which will greatly increase traction.
    The sand on the other hand is for just in case you do get stuck with your wheels spinning in the snow. Once you clear excess snow away from your tires, you can pour some sand under the front and back of your tires and that should get you moving again.
  • Get new wiper blades – You will want to get new wiper blades as well as a spare set to keep in your trunk just in case something goes wrong with the ones you are currently using while you’re driving in winter conditions. You should also fill your wiper fluid and make sure that you have extra somewhere in your car.
  • Get your oil changed – You will want to get your oil changed to a viscosity that is lower because this oil will perform better in much colder temperatures. Be sure when you are picking an oil that you pick the oil with the W in the number. For example, many people recommend 5W30 for winter weather. The W, as you might have guessed it, stands for Winter.
  • Make sure you have the right emergency supplies – Be sure that you have things like:
    • Road flares
    • A spare tire (not just a donut)
    • Jumper cables
    • A fully charged cell phone and something that will give you the ability to charge it in your car
    • Blankets
    • A first aid kit
    • Ice scraper
    • A roadside assistance program such as AAA or an easily accessible number for a reliable tow truck.

 

Drive Slow

This is the most important thing to remember about driving in winter conditions. If you take it nice and easy then the risk for an accident decreases greatly.

Driving slower will increase the amount of time that you have to react to something. It also reduces the chance of your car slipping and sliding.

Over a hundred thousand Americans are injured and more than thirteen hundred are killed on snowy, slushy or icy pavement every winter. This goes to show you that driving with caution in winter weather is so important.
 

Tips for driving in the snow and ice

Use these tips when you are driving in snowy and icy conditions:

  • Come to a stop gradually – When you’re trying to come to a stop on a snowy or icy road, it is always better to do so at a very gradual pace. You can accomplish this by taking your foot off of the acceleration well before your intended stop point. Then, hit your brake pedal gently but completely. Don’t slam on it. When you slam on it you will end up sliding further than if you came to a gradual stop.
  • If you start sliding to the left or right DON’T break – That might sound ridiculous but doing so will only help accelerate the slide. Instead, turn your wheels into the direction that the back of the car is sliding. Also, be sure to avoid overcorrecting as well.
  • Drive slow! – We know we already discussed this at length, but it cannot be overstated how important this is when you are driving in winter conditions. This can easily, and often is, the difference between getting to your destination safely and getting into an accident.

 

Conclusion

Driving in winter weather conditions is no picnic. But, if you prepare properly it will be a lot easier and safer.

Try visiting Alaska during the warmer seasons if you want to try to avoid driving in inclement winter weather all together.

However, if you do end up driving in the ice and snow, be sure to drive safely!

Jump to:

Dalton Highway can be dangerous
Dalton Highway can be lonely
Tips for driving on Dalton Highway
Conclusion


 
driving-on-dalton-highway-alaska

Dalton Highway can be dangerous

Dalton Highway in Alaska is one of the most isolated roads on the planet. It is also one of the most dangerous. At four hundred and fourteen miles long, the road will take you from the Elliot Highway, which is a few miles north of Fairbanks to Prudhoe Bay, near the Artic Ocean.

It was originally built in the 1970’s as a supply route for Trans-Alaska Pipeline System. In fact, until 1994, the road was mainly only open to commercial traffic. That traffic was mainly the trucks carrying the oil back and forth from the Prudhoe oil fields.

The road has a reputation for being so dangerous that it has been featured on the British TV show World’s Most Dangerous Roads as well as four seasons of Ice Road Truckers.

There are crosses and small memorials all along the highway in places where people have sadly lost their lives in past accidents. These memorials serve to honor those we have lost but also help remind us to navigate such a dangerous with extreme caution.

However, if you are an adept driver and want to experience the full expanse of Alaska, you should make a point to take the trip down the Dalton Highway. Many have called it “the ultimate road trip.” With the right caution, low speeds, general know-how and proper supplies, you will be just fine traveling on the Dalton Highway.
 

Dalton Highway can be lonely

Dalton Highway only has three towns along the four hundred plus mile trek. Each of these stops includes places to get gas and spots to grab some basic amenities. However, one of those towns is Deadhorse which marks the northernmost end of the highway. These are the towns you will have access to via Dalton Highway:

  • Coldfoot – Mile 175 – Coldfoot is mostly a truck stop. There is one restaurant and few places to sleep overnight. Most recently, the population was reported as thirteen people total.
  • Wiseman – Mile 188 – Wiseman is another sparsely populated stop on Dalton Highway with fourteen people. There are cabin rentals available – you can read more here.
  • Deadhorse – Mile 414 – Deadhorse is the end of the line for the Dalton Highway. It is mostly just an area of various facilities for workers at the close-by Prudhoe Bay oil fields. The population is about fifty people. However, at any given point there may be as many as three thousand workers staying there. There are amenities available at Deadhorse Camp and the Prudhoe Bay Hotel.

Usually, there are not many other passenger vehicles on the road either. It is mostly just commercial trucks driven by workers going to or coming from the Prudhoe Bay area.

There are no other towns along the highway other than the two mentioned above with a combined population of twenty-seven. There’s also no cell phone service either.

Even the police relegate themselves to patrol the highway almost always only by Helicopter. They are only surveying the road to check for accidents or to see if someone needs help. If there are any, they can radio to a ground unit. Traffic violations could not be a lower priority here.

If you are not traveling on the Dalton Highway for work, what you can gain during the trip is an incredible view of Alaska and its breathtaking vastness.
 

Tips for driving on Dalton Highway

  • Bring an abundance of supplies – Make sure you have the following with you when traveling on Dalton Highway in Alaska:

    • As much food and water you might think you need for a twelve to fourteen hour drive.
    • Blankets and pillows in case you need to pull over and rest.
    • Extra gas just in case.
    • CDs or something with the ability to play pre-programmed music. You likely won’t get much radio or satellite reception.
    • Extra car supplies such as windshield wipers, headlights, a spare tire, flares, a battery and tools.
    • An ability to charge your phone through your car or a portable and pre-charged charger.

  • The trucks rule the road, drive accordingly – The U.S. Department of the Interior says that big trucks always have the right of the way. The road is intended for them. Always pull over and yield to the trucks on Dalton Highway
  • Drive slow and always maintain concentration – It cannot be overstated how dangerous this road can be if you don’t take proper care while driving. If you drive slowly and pay attention, you’ll be just fine. You should switch driving with someone after, at most, half-way through the trip so that you do not get too tired while driving.
  • Watch out for potholes – Due to all the water and ice on or near the road in conjunction with the massive trucks that drive along the route, potholes are a large factor on the Dalton Highway.
  • Only travel on this road during the summer months – From June to August travel on the Dalton usually has pretty moderate temperatures and weather. Temperatures normally range between fifty and seventy degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Use vehicle that is ready for a long trip with potential for inclement weather – You should not venture out on the Dalton Highway with a motorcycle or small car. You should only travel on this road with a larger vehicle with four-wheel drive if at all possible. You should also get your car serviced and inspected before you drive the Dalton Highway.

 

Conclusion

The Dalton Highway is an experience essentially reserved for very experienced, patient and safe drivers. Driving on the road requires the utmost respect for the possible danger it holds. However, it’s an experience like no other. It’s a great way to take in the central and northern Alaskan expanse.

If you have a car that you think could make the trip up the Dalton Highway and want it shipped there call RoadRunner Auto Transport today at 888-777-2123.

Posted in: Alaska Car Shipping

Jump to:
The cheapest flights to Alaska
The most convenient flights to Alaska
Tips for flying to Alaska
Conclusion

 
alaska-airplane-flight
 

The cheapest flights to Alaska

You have chosen to ship your car to Alaska instead of trying to drive it there. We do not blame you. The drive to Alaska can take a week or longer depending on where you are driving from and how long you are taking breaks for. Shipping your car to Alaska might take a few extra days than driving would but you won’t have to deal with the stress of driving through multiple states and Canada to get your car there.

Now, you spent the money on shipping your car to Alaska. So, you likely want to save on the flight there. The good news is you can. The following list will help you sort through all the possible options and find yourself a cheap flight to Alaska:

  • Kayak – Kayak is a long trusted site that has been in business for a decade and a half. They have over two billion searches per year on their site from people looking for travel information and deals of flights, hotels and more.
  • Trip Advisor – Trip Advisor is another great site to check out and compare information about cheap flights to Alaska on. Trip Advisor has been around for almost two decades now since its founding in the year 2000. Based on last year’s data, it is the world’s largest travel site.
  • Expedia – Expedia was founded back in 1996. It’s a full-service travel site that can help you with almost any of your travel needs from flights to attractions. The site boasts over thirty million travel related reviews.

  • Travelocity - Travelocity is another trusted and even more well marketed site for finding flights and other travel arrangements. You likely recognize their name from their entertaining television commercials. They are owned by Expedia.
  • CheapFlights – Cheapflights is a subsidiary of Kayak. It was founded over twenty years ago. It is another great choice if you are looking to get a discounted flight to Alaska.
  • Skyscanner – Skyscanner is another travel fare aggregator website and was founded back in 2002. It is another well-known and trusted alternative to finding cheap flights. It is owned by Ctrip which is the biggest travel company in China.

 

The most convenient flights to Alaska

You might not care that much about the cost of your flight to Alaska. You may just want a nice and stress-free experience during your flight. Most airlines will have regular flights which all have the typical boarding and flight processes.

However, some airlines have higher rates of things like mishandled baggage or rate of overall complaints.

If you want to avoid airlines with those sorts of negative marks against them and don’t mind paying a little extra in the process, you should consider flying with the following airlines:

  • Alaska Airlines – Alaska Airlines is the top airline for flying to and from Alaska. They started their operations almost seventy-five years ago and has most of it’s operations and hubs on the west coast of the United States. You can get a flight on Alaska from almost anywhere in the US though. Flights from New York’s JFK airport to Anchorage, Alaska cost between seven hundred and a thousand dollars as of February 2019.
  • Delta – Delta started its operations almost a century ago back in 1929. It has long been one of the biggest and most trusted names in air travel. They offer many flights to Alaska which can vary greatly in price depending on when you are traveling, where exactly in Alaska you are traveling to or from and what class of ticket you choose.

 

Tips for flying to Alaska

If you are flying to Alaska for the first time you might want some advice on making the most out of your flight. You can use the following tips during your flight to Alaska:

  • Deal with your flight online – Most airlines now have apps that you can download to your phone. On these apps, you can check-in for your flight, check out your flight status and much more. This can help you save a lot of time during the boarding process.
  • Dress for your destination – If you are traveling to Alaska during the winter months it will be quite cold when you step out of the airport. Make sure that you dress warm enough for that weather. At the very least, put another coat and/or pair of gloves in your carry-on luggage so you can put it on when you arrive.
  • Measure your carry-on bag – Make sure that you measure your carry-on bag so that you don’t have to end up checking it. Each airline will have their own specifications regarding this so be sure to check the airline’s website or to give them a call before you pack for your flight.
  • Double-check what you can and can’t carry-on – Be sure that you properly limit any liquids, creams, gels and aerosols. They must be less than three and a half ounces per item. Keep them in a bag that is easy to access when you are at the checkpoint.
  • Be sure to factor in leg room – Flights to Alaska can be pretty long. Many make use of connecting flights. Be sure that if you have any comfort related issues that could require extra leg room that you purchase a seat with enough space.

 

Conclusion

Your flight to Alaska can unfortunately get complicated in several areas. We hope this guide will help you as much as possible.

Either way, your car shipment to Alaska should not be. That’s why you should ship with Alaska Car Transport. Worry about your flight, not your vehicle shipment.

Jump to:
Anchorage
Fairbanks
Juneau
Wasilla
Ketchikan
Homer
Conclusion

 
get-your-car-serviced-in-alaska

 
Once you have your car shipped to Alaska, you are likely going to need to get it serviced or repaired sooner than later. You might just need a tire rotation, or maybe your heat stopped working which could be dangerous in the Alaskan climate during certain times of the year.

Alaska has many automotive service shops. This makes sense because cars always need more service the colder the weather gets.

However, some of these shops might not have great reputations. That is why we assembled the following list, so you can choose from the best of the best for your automotive service needs.
 

Anchorage

  • L & M Motors Inc. - In business for over thirty years L & M Motors Inc. is a very reputable automotive service shop in Anchorage. They offer service for alignment, brakes, tires, transmissions, oil changes and much more. You can call them at 907-563-4994.
  • Big O’s Automotive – Big O’s Automotive has been a renowned name in Anchorage automotive service for over two decades. Big O’s offers engine repair, fluid changes, brake repairs, alignments, transmission service, tune-ups and more. Call them at (907) 272-5461.
  • Artic Import Repair – Another auto repair shop in Anchorage in business for over thirty years, Artic Import Repair offers a wide variety of services. These services include: engine repair, oil changes, air conditioning service and inspections. Give them a call at (907) 277-3399
  • Fair Repair AK – Fair Repair AK offers oil changes, tire rotations, part replacement and much more. You can contact them at (907) 563-0700.
  • Vato’s Garage – Vato’s offers brake services, engine repair, suspension services, tire rotation, and more. You can make an appointment by calling them at (907) 272-0000.

 

Fairbanks

  • Right Choice Automotive Repair – With over twenty-five years of experience, Right Choice Automotive Repair has long been a popular choice for the people of Fairbanks. They specialize in tune-ups, engine repairs, transmissions, heating, air conditioning and much more. Call them at (907) 322-2886.
  • Grrr Safety and Services LLC – Grrr Safety and Services LLC was opened in 2016. They offer brake services, oil changes, engine repair, air conditioning services, tire rotation and a bunch more. You can call them for an appointment at (907) 371-0700.
  • Simard Automotive – Simard Automotive is one of the most trusted names in Fairbanks when it comes to automotive service. They offer most automotive repair services you can think of such as: air conditioning, brakes, diagnostics, oil changes and emissions to name a few. You can call them at (855) 690-0889. They do have two locations in Fairbanks, so be sure to ask them which one your appointment is at.
  • University Chevron – University Chevron has been in business since 1977. They specialize in engine service, brake repair, vehicle inspections and oil changes. They are also a NAPA AutoCare Center. Call them at (866) 833-7317.
  • The Front End Shop – The Front End Shop was opened back in 1983. They offer inspections, tire rotation, brake services, suspension services, oil changes and more. Get in touch with them by calling (907) 479-7550.

 

Juneau

  • Fix Auto Juneau – Fix Auto Juneau specializes in dent repair, collision repair, and paint repair amongst other things. They can be reached at (877) 816-9058.
  • Foreign Auto Repair – Foreign Auto repair does a little bit of everything. They fix alignments, batteries, belts, brakes, tires, front ends and more. They also offer diagnostics and oil changes. You can contact them at (907) 789-9778.
  • Mike Hatch Auto Sales and Service – Mike Hatch Auto Sales and Service has been in business since 1979. Thy offer diagnostics, oil changes, inspections, tire service and more. They also offer “courtesy rides” which are rides back home and to the shop when your vehicle is being serviced so you won’t have to wait at the shop. Call them at (907) 586-3900.

 

Wasilla

  • Wasilla Lube Express & Auto Mall – Wasilla Lube Express & Auto Mall is one of the more convenient auto service spots in Wasilla, Alaska. It is family owned and offers oil changes, air conditioning service, alignments, brake service, engine service and much more. Their phone number is (907) 373-4948 for the repair shop and (907) 376-9777 for the lube shop.
  • Berkley Automotive Mobile Mechanic Services – Berkley Automotive Mobile Mechanic Services is a mobile mechanic service which means the mechanic will come to you. They offer a sixty day warranty on their work and offer service for general automotive issues and brakes. You can give them a call at (907) 315-7453.
  • Wasilla Family Auto – Wasilla Family Auto is family owned and offers various brake and general auto motive repair services. Give them a call today at (907) 373-1948.

 

Ketchikan

  • All American Auto Repair – All American Auto Repair was founded in 1985 and has been serving the Ketchikan community ever since. They specialize in engine repair, heating and air conditioning repair, auto electrical work, inspections, oil changes and much more. Call them at (907) 225-1250.
  • Lighthouse Service – Lighthouse Service is a NAPA Auto Center and has been serving Ketchikan for many years. They offer oil changes, engine repair, transmission service, body work and more. Contact them at 907-247-2244.

 

Homer

  • Alyeska Tire – Alyeska Tire is a tire and automotive repair shop that’s been serving the Homer area for over thirty years. They specialize in axle repair, brake repair, climate control, oil changes, tire services such as alignment and much more. They can be reached at 907 235-8441.
  • Redline Automotive – Redline Automotive just opened in the end of 2017. However, they do have a good reputation online though. They offer oil changes, brake services, tire services, battery services and more. Their phone number is (907)235-5463.
  • Aftershock Automotive – Aftershock Automotive has been serving the Homer community for several years. They offer various automotive repair services. Call ahead for an appointment at 907-235-2700.

 

Conclusion

Always be sure to call any of these shops before you show up. Some might be by appointment only depending on how busy they are that particular day.

You can also look these shops up online to see if they have any customer reviews.

If you haven’t already shipped your car to Alaska, give Alaska Car Transport a call today at (907) 331-3100.

Posted in: Tips

Jump to:
General info
The fleet
Schedules and fares
Travel policies
Routes
Conclusion

 

An Alaskan ferry as it enters the port of Valdez.

General info

Unlike the continental United States, all of Alaska is not connected by highways and roads. So, if you’re in Alaska for any sort of extended stay, odds are that you’ll need to take one of the ferries at some point. It’s also extremely likely that you’ll need to do so with your car too.

The good thing is that all of Alaska’s Ferries operating on the Alaska Marine Highway System have room for your vehicle on-board. Some have more space than others, but if you book ahead of time, you should have no trouble finding space for yourself or your car.

The Alaska Marine Highway System is Alaska’s most reliable nautical transportation service between coastal communities. Today, it is recognized as a National Scenic Byway as well as an All-American Road. It currently services almost four thousand miles of the gorgeous Alaskan coastline and connects over thirty communities. Some of which cannot be reached by car alone.

There’s several routes and eleven different vessels. Consider the thirty communities these ferries travel between and you can see how someone can get easily confused when trying to coordinate their ferry voyage. However, you can use this handy guide to get to where you’re going by ferry with ease.
 

The fleet

The fleet is comprised of eleven great ferries with a rich history behind each. These ferries operate all year long and can handle passengers and their cars. Get to know the different types of vessels in the fleet:
 

Mainline Ferries

These are the biggest ferries in the fleet. It almost always takes over twenty-four hours to go from the first port to the last port on the route on one of these mainline vessels.

If you are going to be on one of these Ferries overnight, you can rent a cabin on-board to sleep in or you can set up a tent or sleeping bag on the deck. Depending on the season, the second option might not be such a good idea. There are also several places to buy food and drink on-board as well.

  • MV Columbia
    This Ferry is named after the Columbia Glacier and is quite large, the largest of the fleet. It cost twenty million dollars to build.

    It can carry just under five hundred passengers and has a car-carrying capacity of about a hundred and thirty vehicles. It also has over a hundred cabins, about half of which are for up to four people and the other half can fit two people.

    The MV Columbia also boasts many great on-board conveniences. It has a dining room, a restaurant, a couple of lounges including a movie screening lounge, laundry and more.

  • MV Kennicott
    The MV Kennicott is named after the Kennicott Glacier and can be used as a command center for emergency teams in case of an ocean emergency like an oil spill. It has a helicopter pad and a floating dock in case it does need to be used this way. It also has an elevator specifically for loading and unloading cars.

    This ferry can carry about five hundred passengers but can only carry about seventy-five vehicles. It has over a hundred cabins pretty much split between two-person and four-person capacity.

    The MV Kennicott has many nice amenities as well. It has a couple observation decks, a heated solarium, and a few lounges including a movie lounge.

  • MV Malaspina
    The MV Malaspina got its name from the Masaspina Glacier and was one of the three original Alaska Marine Highway System ferries. It can carry four hundred and fifty passengers and eighty-three vehicles. It also has just over seventy cabins with both two and four person capacities.

    It’s amenities for those on board include lounges including a movie lounge and a heated solarium.

  • MV Matanuska
    Named after the Matanuska Glacier, the MV Matanuska was also one of the three original Alaska Marine Highway System ferries. It can carry four hundred and fifty passengers as well as eighty-three cars. There are a hundred cabins with capacities for two or three people.

    The ferry also includes a restaurant, a heated solarium, a movie lounge and a child’s play area.

  • MV Tustumena

    This ferry is named after the Tustumena glacier and has an elevator on-board especially made for loading and un-loading cars. It the smallest Alaska Marine Highway System ferry that has cabins.

    It can carry a hundred and thirty passengers as well as thirty-four cars. It offers passengers a dining room, movie lounge, heated solarium and more.

 

Day Boat Ferries

The purpose of these ferries is to get people from one small community to another as well as with the mainline ferry routes. You can expect a shorter trip on these ships.

  • MV Aurora
    Named for the Aurora Glacier, this ferry can hold up to two hundred and fifty passengers as well as thirty-three cars. It has observations lounges, a movie lounge, a heated solarium and showers available.
  • MV LeConte
    The MV LeConte got its name from the LeConte Glacier. It can carry two hundred and twenty-five passengers as well as thirty-three vehicles. This ship also boasts a restaurant, heated solarium and movie lounge as well.

 

Shuttle Ferries

These are essentially smaller and more limited day boat ferries. They generally only operate back and forth between a couple of small communities each day.

  • FVF Chenega
    Named after the Chenega Glacier, the FVF Glacier is one of the fastest ferries in the Alaska Marine Highway System ferry fleet. It is one of the very first ferries of its kind in the entire United States.

    It carries up to two hundred and ten passengers and thirty-one cars. It also has a snack bar, lounges, child’s play area and a study area as well.

  • FVF Fairweather
    Taking its name from the Fairweather Glacier, is also one of the Fastest ferries in the Alaska Marine Highway System ferry fleet.

    It can hold up to two hundred and ten passengers as well as thirty-one cars. The amenities consist of a snack bar, kid’s play area, solarium and lounges.

  • MV Lituya
    The MV Lituya was named after the Lituya Glacier and is the smallest ferry in the Alaska Marine Highway System ferry fleet. It is also the only vessel in the fleet that is dedicated to a single route (it only goes from Ketchikan to Metlakatla and back).

    The ship can hold up to a hundred and twenty-five passengers and fifteen cars. The perks of being on-board include a couple of lounges and viewing areas.

 

Schedules and fares

Schedules

The schedules for each of these ferries, for every one of their routes for the entire year would be too detailed to post here, so you can them here.

However, there are more general details that you should be aware of. For example, there are many more departures in the summer months than there are any other time of the year. By the same logic, the winter has the least amount of departures. This is based on demand which is generated by increases in tourism or lack thereof for the most part.

Fares

Fares for the Alaska Marine Highway System ferry are determined by:

  • Passengers – The number of passengers is a part of determining your fare. The age of the passengers also matters too. Ages are broken into seniors (65+), adults (12+), child (6-11) and child (0-5).
  • Vehicle – Your vehicle takes part in determining your fare as well. The make and model of your car adds weight and space to the shipment. Thus, it adds extra money to the fare the larger the car.
  • Carry-on Items – Carry on items are classified as: bikes, pets, kayaks and inflatables. These items will require extra room on the ship, so, there is a small additional charge involved.
  • Route Selection – This should be fairly obvious but the route you choose will determine the bulk of your cost for your trip. The further that you are going, the more it will cost you.

Booking Restrictions

The following are booking restrictions for Alaska Marine Highway System ferries:

  • Passenger limit – If you have ten or more people that you are trying to book, you will need to contact them personally. You can do so by e-mailing them at this address.
  • Unaccompanied minors – Although their website does not specify, there are restrictions and qualifications for unaccompanied minors. Get it touch with them before-hand to make sure everything regarding your minor checks out.
  • Vehicle length – The maximum length for a vehicle is thirty feet. The vast majority of cars will fall under this length, so, most of you will not need to worry.
  • Vehicle restrictions – Outside of the length restriction, there are restrictions regarding unaccompanied vehicles and commercial vehicles. You need to contact them if either of those situations applies to you.
  • Cabin Limit – You can only book three cabins per trip. For most of the larger ships, this means twelve people.

 

Travel policies

General policies

There are many policies in place for Alaska Marine Highway System ferries. You should consult their policies page here. Their policies include: animal transport, baggage, conduct, lost and found, marijuana, service animals and more.

Vehicle related policies

Alaska Marine Highway System ferries have several vehicle related policies. They are as follows:

  • Commercial cars and trailers – You need to contact Alaska Marine Highway System ferries if you plan on bringing any commercial vehicle with you during your trip.
  • Kayaks, canoes and inflatables – If you have a kayak, canoe or inflatable you can bring it along as long as it’s being transported with a car. If it’s not it will need its own ticket.
  • Vehicle and vehicle categories – There are several policy points regarding vehicles:
    • Standard Cars – Standard cars are considered anything up to eight feet in length.
    • Oversized cars – Oversized cars are considered a hundred and three inches and over. If your car is between a hundred and three and a hundred and eight inches long, there will be an extra twenty five percent charge. If your vehicle is a hundred and eight inches long or more, you will be charged an extra fifty percent.
    • Motorcycles – You must bring the appropriate tie-downs for your motorcycle. If you are unsure of what this means for you, be sure to contact Alaska Marine Highway System ferries.
    • Recreational vehicles – You must make clear that you are shipping an RV when you are making your reservation. You can not use your RV for dining or sleeping while you are on the boat.
    • Unaccompanied vehicles – Any car that isn’t with a passenger will get charged an additional fee. How much the fee is depends on the destination port. You must also make sure that you make arrangements to have the car removed from the ship upon arrival. If you do not, you will be charged a fee to have the RV towed off the ship.
    • Port restrictions – There are several port-specific restrictions that may apply to your vehicle. You can read more here.

 

Routes

Southeast Alaska

The Southeast route includes communities from Bellingham, Washington and Prince Rupert, British Columbia, through the Inside Passage, all the way to Yakutat.

Routes in this region can take anywhere from an hour to thirty-eight hours depending on where you are traveling to and from.

The Southeast Alaska route stops at the following ports:

Mainline routes

  • Bellingham
  • Ketchikan
  • Wrangell
  • Petersburg
  • Juneau
  • Haines
  • Skagway
  • Sitka
  • Kake
  • Prince Rupert

Day boat routes

  • Juneau
  • Tenakee
  • Angoon
  • Gustavus
  • Hoonah
  • Haines
  • Skagway

Shuttle routes

  • Juneau
  • Sitka
  • Metlakatla

 

The Gulf of Alaska

The Gulf of Alaska route includes ports in Prince William Sound and the Kenai Peninsula.

Routes in this region can take anywhere from nine hours to thirty-eight hours depending on where you are traveling to and from.

The Gulf of Alaska route stops at the following ports:

Mainline routes

  • Bellingham
  • Ketchikan
  • Juneau
  • Yakutat
  • Whittier
  • Chenega Bay
  • Kodiak
  • Homer

 

South Central and Southwest Alaska

The Southwest routes include ports from the Kodiak Island Archipelago, the Alaska Peninsula, and out of the Aleutian Chain to Dutch Harbor.

Routes in this region can take anywhere from six hours to nine hours depending on where you are traveling to and from.

The South Central and Southwest Alaska route stops at the following ports:

Mainline Routes

  • Homer
  • Kodiak
  • Chignik
  • Sand Point
  • King Cove
  • Cold Bay
  • False Pass
  • Akutan
  • Dutch Harbor
  • Seldovia

Day boat routes

  • Whittier
  • Valdez
  • Cordova

 

Conclusion

Taking the ferry in Alaska can be a particularly complex process. However, many times it is the only way to get from one specific spot to another.

It’s also a pleasant experience where you’ll have great views of the Alaskan wilderness the whole way. Be sure you contact the ferry beforehand if you aren’t sure of something.

Jump to:
Nature
Less people and other tourists
It’s cheaper
Conclusion

alaska-in-the-spring

 

Alaska is one of the most expansive and impressive places in the world. Whether you are moving there, or you are just visiting, prepare to see some of the most remarkable sights you’ll ever have the opportunity of laying your eyes on.

Anytime of the year is a good time to make your way up to Alaska. However, winter can be very dark and cold. Summer can be very crowded and expensive. Fall is quite nice, but you might miss some of the wildlife and you likely won’t get to see much of the more winter-prone sights such as glaciers. For these reasons, we recommend that you travel up to Alaska in the spring.
 

Nature

During the spring, Alaska is in transition. It’s quite a sight to see. This is when nature here transforms from a snowy white wonder to the lush green wilderness that so many people who have been to Alaska talk about.

The wildlife really starts to make more frequent appearances as a result of this too. This can include black bears bears, caribou, sheep, goats, multiple types of rarer birds, walrus and more.

In fact, because the weather is getting better and the snow is starting to dissipate, but the vegetation and forest hasn’t fully grown back, it’s a peak opportunity to see the wildlife and snap a few photos.

However, you’ll still be able to see things like glaciers in their full form. When you visit during the summer, you can still see them, but they will more than likely have grown smaller and less impressive than they are at their peak which is during the winter and spring.
 

Less people and other tourists

During the spring, you’ll also encounter less people in Alaska. It’s not the absolute peak time of the year to visit, which is from June to August.

This will help you with things like travel time, rental availability, and sightseeing. Less people means quicker trips and greater opportunity to see even more of Alaska’s incredible wonders.

You will end up primarily dealing with those who live in Alaska year-round as well. This makes for a better experience because you can learn so much about a place from the people who live there and know the lay of the land better than anyone else.
 

It’s cheaper

Just from a simple supply and demand perspective it will be considerably cheaper to come in the spring instead of the summer. Yes, it will be a little cooler but bring a coat and enjoy all the money you saved.

In the spring, you’ll save on flights, tours, hotels and pretty much whatever else you can possibly think of. If you are coming for an extended stay and shipping your car, you’ll save on gasoline too. With the money that you save, you could even end up affording to extend your stay for a few days.
 

Conclusion

When you consider everything, Spring really is the best time to come to Alaska, whether you are just visiting or moving here. You’ll get the full benefit of being here as well as seeing all the incredible scenery and wildlife while saving money.

If you want to skip the rental process and don’t feel like driving all the way through Canada and likely through a large portion of the continental US, we recommend that you ship your car to Alaska. If you’re interested, get a free quote today!

Tips for Driving and Sightseeing in Alaska

Jump to:
Road Rules
Drive to the Sights
Driving Tips
Conclusion

Road Rules

It should be no surprise that Alaska has some different and interesting driving laws because of how challenging the road conditions can be at certain times and in certain areas. There’s also the issue of smaller roads due to lower populations spread across larger areas. Laws are more strictly enforced so the many one lane roads don’t get blocked or congested.

Most of the normal laws are the same: don’t exceed the speed limit, don’t drive under the influence of drugs or alcohol, stop at stop signs and red lights etc. However, there are a bunch of lesser laws that are very different from what you’re likely used to.

One such law allows people to drive with loaded guns (legally registered, of course) in their car. You can have the gun visible or concealed. The only stipulation is that you must be over twenty-one. Alaska is another state like Hawaii where seatbelts must be worn by all passengers. States like New York do not require passengers in the back seat to wear seatbelts in most circumstances.

Headlights are a big area of legislation for Alaskans. During the much lower light winter months, the law requires headlights for longer periods. There are several roads in Alaska that mandate lights must be on at all times while traveling on them. Any one operating a motorcycle in Alaska must always have their headlights on.

It’s illegal to have your brights on within five hundred feet of an oncoming car. Other states have this rule but don’t tend to enforce it too much. However, in Alaska, it is enforced quite strictly. Really what this means is that it’s illegal to flash your brights at someone to warn them to turn their headlights on or about upcoming police. So, to be completely safe and covered, always have your regular headlights on in Alaska – even during the day.

You may actually use your phone while driving in Alaska but not the screen. What does that mean? Well, you can hold the phone to your head and talk but you can’t use the screen at all. This includes texting and even dialing.

Another driving law in Alaska different from most of the United States in that you’re allowed to drive with marijuana and marijuana paraphernalia in your vehicle. However, you may not drive under the influence of marijuana or use it in your vehicle or anywhere in public. You also must be twenty-one years of age or older to do this.
Finally, potential motorists are allowed to earn their learner’s permit at only fourteen years of age in Alaska. This is tied for the youngest age in the country.

Drive to the Sights

Now that your aware of the different laws on the road and how to obey them, you should take note of some of the better attractions and sights there are in Alaska. Keep in mind, if you aren’t moving there permanently, you likely won’t get the chance to see everything on this list as Alaska is over six hundred thousand square miles big.

  • Denali National Park

    – With over six million acres of mountains, rivers, tundras and breath-taking wilderness the Denali National Park is the heart of Alaskan sight-seeing. It’s located about two hours south west of Fairbanks and boasts an impressive roster of wildlife with grizzly bears, wolves, reindeer, elk, huskies and numerous birds.

  • Denali-National-Park.

  • Alaska Highway

    – With rolling views of glacier-tipped mountains and lush Alaskan forests, the Alaska Highway is a perfect way to get where your going while taking in the sights. The highway runs from Delta Junction, Alaska into Canada and the Yukon Territory.

  • alaska-highway

  • Kenai Fjords National Park

    – Located in Seward, the Kenai Fjords National Park has some of the biggest glaciers you’ll see as well as some of the biggest bears.

  • Kenai-Fjords-National-park

  • Dalton Highway

    – Beginning just north of Fairbanks and stretching over four hundred miles to Prudhoe Bay, the Dalton Highway is a great way to break in your wheels in Alaska while taking in the gorgeous expanse that is the arctic circle at its northern-most end. This is where, from September through the spring, you can see the impressive Northern Lights. Along the highway you can also make stops at the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and the Gates of the Arctic National Park & Preserve.

  • dalton-highway

  • Iditarod National Historic Trail

    – Home to a globally renowned and revered tradition, the Iditarod National Historic Trail is absolutely one of the can’t miss attractions in Alaska. The trail is the home to the world’s most famous dog sled race, the Iditarod. Along the trail you’ll be able to get great views of glaciers, mountains and the vast Alaskan landscape.

  • Totem Bight State Historic Park

    – With a great look into the rich culture and history of Alaska, the Totem Bight State Historic Park gives you an up-close look at picturesque Lake Tiulana and some dwellings of Alaska Natives. The park is located in Anchorage.

  • Mendenhall Glacier

    – Located just a few miles north of Juneau, the Mendenhall Glacier is an icy blue wonder that you can only see in Alaska. It’s widely considered the crowning point of the impressive and massive Juneau ice field.

Driving Tips

These tips will help you navigate the roads in Alaska with a little more ease and piece of mind. Use these in conjunction with the Rules of the Road to ensure the best driving experience possible.

  • Watch out for wildlife! Depending on what part of Alaska you’re in, there could be moose, bears, wolves, bison, or caribou crossing the road at any time. Hitting one of these animals could easily total your car. Worse, they could be endangered, and you could be held liable for the death of an endangered animal.
  • Be prepared for inclement weather at all times. Always have your car weatherproofed. Have an emergency kit and extra supplies ready in case you ever get stranded. Supplies you should have ready include: a spare tire & the tools to change a tire, gravel or kitty litter to help you if you need traction, a flashlight, batteries, blankets/sleeping bags, extra clothes, nonperishable foods & water, jumper cables, a small shovel, extra gasoline, matches, knife, spare wiper blades as well as spare bulbs for your headlights and whatever else you think might be able to help you if you end up in a pinch.
  • Have a roadside assistance plan like AAA. If something does happen and you do get stuck, having a roadside assistance plan will prove invaluable.
  • If you start sliding be sure to turn into the direction of the slide. This means turn your front wheels in the same direction that the rear of the vehicle is sliding. So, if the rear of your vehicle is sliding left, turn your wheel left.
  • Don’t tailgate anyone. If the roads are iced up, you tailgate and the person in front of you stops short you will very likely end up sliding into them.

Conclusion

Alaska is a very big place. It’s about a third the size of the lower forty-eight states. So, I guess you could say that having your car there is pretty important. However, it’s not the easiest place to drive in. Frequent snowy and icy weather can cause massive delays for travel.

It’s only prudent to prepare yourself for the drive with know-how and any supplies you might need if an emergency does occur. If you’re in Alaska or you’re on your way and need your car there, the auto transport experts at Alaska Car Transport can help you out. Get a free quote today.

Jump to:
The basics about shipping your vehicle to Alaska
Why ship instead of drive?
What will it cost me to ship my car to Alaska?
How long will it take to ship my car to Alaska?
Where can I ship my car in Alaska?
The types of cars you can ship to Alaska
The best ways to ship your car to Alaska
What’s next after my vehicle is delivered?
Conclusion
 
car shipped to Alaska

 
From pretty much anywhere in the continental United States, a trip by car to Alaska is quite a long haul. Whether staying for an extended period or moving there, most people choose to ship their car there.
Having your own vehicle is almost a necessity in Alaska where everything is much more spread out, public transportation is much less available, and rentals tend to be a little more expensive. Alaska is, by far, the largest US state clocking in at well over six hundred thousand square miles big.

In general, renting a car during an extended trip can prove extremely costly. Many times, it makes much more sense just to ship your own vehicle to your destination. You probably have several questions like “What will it cost?” and “How long will it take?”

This guide is designed to answer your questions and give you all the detail you need in order to be able to ship your car to Alaska and be confident while you are doing so.
 

The basics about shipping your vehicle to Alaska

First and foremost, you’ll want to make sure that you plan ahead. Realistically, you can expect it to be without your car for a little over a week to two weeks while it ships to the last frontier (Alaska). Your shipping duration will vary based on several factors most importantly including distance.

So, you will need to decide, do you want to split that time between when you are home and in Alaska? Do you want to spend a week or so at home without your vehicle? Or do you want to wait a week or so while you are in Alaska? It’s entirely up to you.

You should also give your auto transport company as much notice about your shipment as possible. Expedited shipping will cost you an additional fee so try and avoid last minute planning if you can. We recommend that you give your auto transporter a month’s notice, so you will have the best results and lowest cost.

As with any other vehicle shipment, you will want to be sure that you have your car ready for shipping by the time your driver arrives to pick up your car:

  • Make sure that you have a quarter tank of gas but no more than that. This allows the driver to get the car on and off the carrier as they need to but won’t add extra weight to the vehicle and will adhere to Coast Guard regulations as well.
  • Be sure to wash the exterior of the car before shipping so that the driver can easily conduct their inspection for pre-existing damage before loading your car.
  • Take any detachable non-essential parts off of the vehicle such as roof racks.
  • Be sure you have all of your documents ready by the time your driver arrives to pick up your vehicle. This includes: your driver’s license, registration, and a copy of your booking.
  • Make sure you have an extra copy of your key just in case anything happens to the one you gave your driver.
  • Take all personal items out of the vehicle. Any personal items left in the vehicle will not be covered by insurance if they are damaged, lost or stolen.
  • Be sure to tell your driver about any existing issues with the car such as your alignment being off or a headlight being out.

You should also be sure to weather proof your car for the Alaskan climate prior to shipping it. That way, you won’t have to worry about doing so after transport.
 

Why ship instead of drive?

The obvious answer here is that it will take a lot of time and energy and it will just make life less stressful in general by shipping your car and flying to Alaska.

However, many people don’t know how much driving will end up costing them. Consider that with the average cost of fuel right now, a trip in an average car from New York to Anchorage will cost over $400 one-way. Also consider that you will need to spend several nights in hotels. This will run between $500 and $1000. So, driving yourself will still cost about a thousand dollars (if you were doing so from New York).

The above calculation also doesn’t factor in opportunity cost either. Opportunity cost is “a benefit missed when an investor, individual or business chooses one alternative over another.”

So, when you drive your car instead of shipping it, the opportunity cost includes things like missed days of work. You’re either spending paid time off performing the awful task of driving thousands of miles or, worse, you’re taking un-paid time off and surrendering about a week’s worth of salary.

That’s $1,000 in actual cost and a few hundred dollars more in opportunity cost. For a couple hundred extra dollars you can save the stress of driving thousands of miles and the opportunity cost of missing work.
 

What will it cost me to ship my car to Alaska?

Like any other car shipment, this will depend entirely on where you are shipping it from, the season and the type of vehicle that you are shipping.

For our purposes, lets assume we’re shipping a car of average size on an open-air carrier during the fall (a less busy time, so, demand is down). It will cost a little under two thousand dollars to ship from Seattle to Anchorage. If you were shipping from Miami, Florida to Anchorage with everything else equal, it would cost about four thousand dollars.

In the end, both trips are a few thousand miles long. The trip from Seattle being slightly over two thousand miles and the trip from Miami being over four thousand miles. So, those prices are quite reasonable. Both coming in at a little less than a dollar a mile.

Any half-decent carrier or broker will give you a free quote. So, be sure to take advantage of that and shop around a little bit before you commit to ship your car.

Just be aware, whenever you are shipping your car anywhere that the quotes you get will be reasonably close to the same price. If you get a quote that’s way lower than all the other competitors, it’s likely a bait and switch scam. For example, if four carriers quote: $2000, $2100, $950 and $2050 respectively for the same shipment the outlier ($950) is a scam of some sort.

Most of the time these “bait and switch” scams offer you that low price initially, pick up your car, then tell you there is some issue and demand an additional exorbitant payment. If you refuse to pay it, they will say your car is “already in-transit” and will hold your vehicle hostage. So, avoid these “too good to be true” prices for auto shipping.
 

How long will it take to ship my car to Alaska?

As we mentioned earlier it will generally take around ten to fourteen days to ship your car to Alaska. However, it really does depend on the time of year that you’re shipping, how far you’re shipping and the weather along the shipping route at the time of your particular shipment.

A cross country shipment like Miami, Florida to Alaska or New York to Alaska will likely take closer to two and a half weeks while Seattle to Alaska could end up taking less than one week for example.
Transit times increase noticeably during carriers “busy season” too. If you ship to Alaska in the fall versus in the summer your transit time for your shipment will likely be a day or two less. This is because as Carriers get busier, there are less of them available. Thus, your shipment will take more time to get to Alaska.

When shipping your vehicle anywhere, you should always plan for the later date of the estimate you get. Most carriers and brokers will give you an estimate on when your car will be delivered. These estimates usually have a three or four day window. It’s best to be prepared for the later part of the estimate in case that’s when the vehicle ends up being dropped off. This way, if it gets delivered earlier than that it won’t be an issue either.
 

Where can I ship my car in Alaska?

When you ship your car to Alaska you’ll need to pick it up at one of the major ports/central hubs. Don’t worry though, there’s a bunch of ports or central hubs in Alaska where you can choose to ship to. Just choose the port closest to you. The lack of major highways make it almost impossible for auto carriers to get across the state, so residential drop-off generally isn’t available in Alaska.

The ports and hubs in Alaska we ship vehicles to are:

• Anchorage
• Fairbanks
• Dutch Harbor
• Kodiak
• Juneau
• Ketchikan
• Sitka
• Petersburg
• Wrangell
• Craig
• Kake
• Hoonah
• Haines
• Skagway
• Yakutat
• Cordova
• Thorne Bay
• Valdez
 

The types of cars you can ship to Alaska

You can ship any kind of car you want to Alaska. You may even be able to ship your vehicle if it’s inoperable but check with your shipping provider before you book your shipment.

However, you can also ship many other types of cargo to Alaska. This includes: cars, trucks, SUVs, vans, motorcycles, trailers, RVs, and heavy equipment such as tractors. We recommend calling your shipping provider to discuss any of these sorts of shipments prior to trying to book one.
 

The best ways to ship your car to Alaska

There’s a bunch of different things to take into consideration when shipping a car to Alaska. The type of transport that you choose is one of them. The vast majority of auto transports are open air transports. These are the normal type of auto carriers you typically see out on the road with a couple of decks of cars.

Sometimes, people will pay a couple of extra dollars to get their car shipped in what’s called the “top load.” The top load are the vehicles on the upper deck of the auto carrier. This is normally advantageous because vehicles in the “bottom load” can get hit with small road debris like pebbles which can cause small scratches or dents during transport. However, the vehicles on the bottom load are partially shielded from the elements because of the cars above them. The cars in the top load are completely exposed to the elements such as snow and rain.

Considering that part of your auto transport will take place in and around Alaska, there’s a good chance snow and ice will occur on the route. So, you will need to carefully consider if you want to risk much higher snow and ice exposure in lieu of avoiding small road debris.

You can avoid both of these things by using a completely enclosed auto carrier during your auto transport. The only downside to this is that it will cost several hundred extra bucks whereas “top load” on an open carrier only costs about a hundred extra bucks and “bottom load” on an open carrier costs nothing extra.

Realistically, most carriers and brokers can offer you these various shipping options and additional upgrades if you so choose. We recommend you use Alaska Car Transport as we are experts at moving any type of vehicle to any part of Alaska. If you need any more information about us or our services, feel free to give us a call today at (907) 331-3100.
 

What’s next after my vehicle is delivered?

Once you get there and your car is delivered, you are permitted to use a valid out-of-state registration for up to sixty days. So, if you’re staying longer than that, you’ll obviously need to get a new registration.

If you are permanently moving to Alaska, you’ll need to get it registered with the Alaskan DMV and get your documentation and license plates changed. Unfortunately, this can be as arduous of a process as it is in any other state.

There are certain cases where you can have all this done online or over the phone. You will need to call the Alaskan DMV and ask them or contact them online by visiting http://doa.alaska.gov/dmv/.

If you are a new Alaska resident, you will need to register in-person at the DMV unless you live more than fifty miles away from the closest DMV in which case you can register by mail. Unfortunately, you will need to do this within ten days of starting your residency in Alaska.

You will also need to get new license plates shortly after having your car delivered if you are permanently moving to Alaska. You can find more information by visiting http://doa.alaska.gov/dmv/plates/index.htm.
 

Conclusion

The vehicle registration process once your car is delivered is probably the most complex part of getting a car to Alaska. That’s why you should ship your car there and have one less thing to worry about. If you’re only visiting, then you have even less to worry about by shipping your vehicle.

Driving all the way to Alaska from anywhere in the Continental United States will be a trip of a couple thousand miles. That’s several days on the road. Spending money on fuel and lodging and probably pulling ten or even twelve-hour days driving.

The money that you end up spending on gas and lodging adds up and can easily reach more than half the cost of shipping your car. So, for an extra couple hundred bucks you can skip the long haul and ship your car to Alaska.